Tag Archives: Wholesome food

Baked Rhubarb With Orange And Cloves

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Although rhubarb is readily available through autumn it’s often not till early winter that I get round to baking my first tray.

I keep it on hand in the fridge mainly to eat with breakfast, be it with porridge, yoghurt, or muesli. But it would be a crime against rhubarb to stop there. It’s such an interesting fruit to use in baking, that when I do have cooked rhubarb in the fridge, I often feel compelled to bake.

Sometimes I arrange batons of rhubarb across a butter milk cake – before it goes in the oven – or I fold it through and on top of muffins, and have even been known to layer it in the bottom of creme brûlées.

 

 

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The tartness of rhubarb is its defining appeal. And that tartness requires a certain amount of sweetness to tame its sour taste and soften its flavour. I use orange juice, brown sugar and cloves to do this.

As the rhubarb slowly cooks, covered in the oven, it half steams half poaches itself to tender pieces. When cooked just right rhubarb should hold its shape easily, yet still fall apart at the touch of a spoon.

So next time you’re out shopping and you see rhubarbs bright red stalks staring back at you, reach out, grab a bunch, come home, flick the oven on, and you too can discover the many possibilities with baked rhubarb.

 

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Baked rhubarb with orange and cloves

Ingredients 

1 bunch thick stemmed rhubarb

zest 1/2 an orange

1 orange juiced

1/4 cup brown sugar

8 cloves

Pre heat oven to 160C.

Trim the rhubarb of all its leaves, wash and cut into 6 cm lengths.

Lay the rhubarb neatly in a small baking tray.

Place the orange juice, orange zest, brown sugar and cloves in a small pan, stir over a medium heat till sugar dissolves, then pour the liquid over the rhubarb. Cover the tray tightly with foil and bake in the oven for about 35 minutes for thicker stalked rhubarb, less for thinner rhubarb.

Cool completely in the tray before transferring the rhubarb to a container, cover and store the rhubarb in the cooking syrup in the fridge for up to five days.

Roasted Brussel Sprout And Chickpea Salad With Garlic Yoghurt

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A dear friends Aunty who I lived with for six months in Brighton, the UK, (20 odd years ago now), would steam her brussels for hours on end.

On a Sunday morning (it was always a Sunday) she would begin the day by steaming the vegetables for the evening meal (gulp). The poor overcooked brussel sprouts would then sit all day on the stove top sweating in their pot till we all came home from the pub and she’d proceeded to heat them again before serving our Sunday roast with something I can only refer to as muck.

It was a crime against the vegetables and one that brussel sprouts never made a recovery from. That is till this year, when I pushed aside those horrid memories and took to roasting them.

 

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Suddenly there was reason to love this misrepresented vegetable. To write a recipe for it. To post it here on this food blog.

I urge anyone who has a brussel sprout phobia to fight back. To say ‘No’ to hating brussel sprouts, and ‘Yes’ to roasting them.

This quick and easy way of preparing them with za’atar, garlic, chickpeas and extra virgin olive oil is so delicious, and so simple, that it is side dish you will be sure to fall back on time-and-time-again.

It’s a side dish to serve with a roast, or a good steak, or any number of other vegetable dishes like creamy potatoes and baked pumpkin.

And what I really love about this dish is the whole cloves of garlic, roasted with the sprouts then skinned and chopped and folded through Greek yoghurt with mint if you fancy, the taste is strong yet subtle, creamy and rounded.

 

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Roasted brussel sprout and chickpea salad with garlic yoghurt 

600g brussel sprouts, washed and halved

400g can chickpeas, drained and rinsed

1 tbsp za’atar

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to drizzle at the end

4 cloves garlic, smashed but kept in their skin

Sea salt

Cracked black pepper

1/2 cup Greek natural yoghurt

1 tbsp chopped mint

1tbsp lemon juice

Pre heat oven to 200C.

Cut the washed brussel sprouts in half and place in a large bowl. Add the drained chickpeas, za’atar, 2tbsp extra virgin olive oil, garlic, and sea salt and cracked pepper, toss till well coated.

Line a large tray with baking paper and spread the brussels over the tray. Roast for 30 minutes, or till roasted and caramalised looking.  Half way through cooking sprinkle the sprouts with 1 tbsp water to add moisture during the roasting process.

Set the sprouts aside and pick out the garlic, remove the skin and chop it to a fine paste, combine the garlic with the yoghurt, mint, lemon juice, 1 tbsp water, and season with sea salt and pepper.

Dollop the garlic yoghurt all over the brussel sprouts and serve warm.

French lentil casserole an alternative to meaty dishes

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French lentils, with their motley coloured blue skins, are an excellent choice for cooking. They require no soaking and hold their firmness well.

This peasant style French lentil casserole is one I like to cook because it’s wholesome, hearty, and a great alternative to meaty dishes. I’ve just finished working on a round of winter recipes for the magazine that were rich and decadent and used various cuts of meat that needed long and slow cooking.  Ben Dearnley, one of Sydney’s well known food photographers, shot the pics yesterday, so officially, it’s a wrap! It’s time to satisfy my hunger for some lighter vegetarian fair.

 

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Don’t underestimate the importance of fresh herbs in a casserole. These should be used in the cooking and the finishing of the dish. My dearest winter herbs – lemon thyme and fresh bay leaves – are put to work in this lentil rich dish as the corner stones of flavour and labour alongside a large red chilli, split down the middle, which is then simmered gently in the lentils for a peppery bite to the dish. Diced carrots, celery, onion and garlic are necessary casserole ingredients.

The other herb that i use time and again is parsley. Here, it’s roughly chopped and pounded in the mortar and pestle with red wine vinegar, for acidity, and extra virgin olive oil for a smooth grassy flavour. If I was not to show restraint, parsleys vibrant colour and flavour would possibly end up in every savoury dish i cooked. Yet, with an abundant amount growing in the garden I hardly see reason to hold back. I also encourage finishing this casserole with a wild rocket pesto. Rocket leaves can be blitzed with pine nuts, parmesan, lemon and extra virgin olive oil for excellent results and a dollop added to the finished meal.

 

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Once cooked, this casserole doubles as a soup base and can be extended with a good vegetable stock and some toasted sourdough. It freezes well so portion it up into small amounts and satisfy your vegetarian cravings at a later date, possibly as a remedy to over indulgence.

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French lentil casserole

Ingredients

2tbsp olive oil

1 red onion

2 sticks celery

2 carrots

4 cloves garlic, sliced

1 tbsp picked and chopped lemon thyme

3 fresh bay leaves, or two dried bay leaves if fresh unavailable.

1 large red chilli, split length ways

1 cup French lentils

1 litre vegetable stock

350g washed kipfler potatoes

2/3 cup roughly chopped parsley

2 tbsp red wine vinegar

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Sea salt

Cracked black pepper

 

Dice the onion, celery and carrots into 1cm dice. Heat olive oil in a heavy bottomed casserole dish and add vegetables, cook gently for several minutes. Add garlic, herbs, and salt and cook a further 2 minutes.

 

Slice washed kipfler potatoes (skin on) into 1cm thick rounds. Add vegetable stock, lentils, kipfler potatoes and whole red chilli to the casserole dish, bring to the boil and cook gently for 15 minutes. Use a ladle to skim any excess scum that cooks out of the lentils. Cover with a lid and simmer a further 15-20 minutes. Check seasoning and set aside.

 

Place the roughly chopped parsley in a mortar and pestle, add red wine vinegar, sea salt, black pepper and extra virgin olive oil, pound till ingredients are well combined (you could also use a small food processor, or chop parsley by hand and mix together in a small bowl).

 

Add the parsley oil to the lentil casserole and stir to combine. Divide between bowls and eat.